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A place to discuss topics/games with other webDiplomacy players.
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kaner406 (2243 D Mod (B))
Thu 24 Nov UTC
(+3)
Artificial Intelligence for Diplomacy has arrived
Check out the author list as well...

https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.ade9097
14 replies
Open
The Ambassador (1988 D (B))
02 Sep 16 UTC
(+9)
New podcast for online Dip games
Hi everyone

Kaner and I have started a podcast about playing Diplomacy online....
320 replies
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David E. Cohen (1000 D)
Thu 17 Nov UTC
vDip Discord Server?
Why isn't there one? It seems like every other large or small forum or group has its own Discord server.
11 replies
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butterhead (1147 D)
21 May 12 UTC
(+14)
Advertise your NON-live games here!
In an effort to compromise the pro-ads versus anti-ads for games: Post here for your non-live games to cut down on the number of ads but still advertise games. Post game link, WTA or PPSC, and the bet. Note: this doesn't count for special rules games.
3266 replies
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Qapoleon (1000 D)
Sat 19 Nov UTC
Variant Cataloging
I've been trying to keep track of variants made. Recently Stephen Agar came back on the scene and I am helping him amass variants over the past 20 years or so of his inactivity. I've made a google spreadsheet that contains the ones he's cataloged on his various websites and added a bunch that I knew of. I've also made a form to submit variants to be cataloged.
8 replies
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Minihugo (897 D)
Sun 20 Nov UTC
Post a variant?
Hey guys! Im wondering is I can suggest a variant to be added to the site? and if so how?
4 replies
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gman314 (1016 D)
12 Mar 11 UTC
(+26)
Winning
Oli won.
On Imperial Civilization's off-topic thread (link inside), there was a brief stint of Second to Last Person to Post Wins. Now that the thread is closed, Oli won.
10043 replies
Open
David Hood (976 D)
Fri 18 Nov UTC
November 2022 Deadline News is out!
Latest edition of Deadline News is out, from the Diplomacy Broadcast Network. Lots of hobbyist interviews from World Dipcon, a discussion with Ed Sullivan about his experiences arguing a case at the US Supreme Court, and headlines from around the World of Diplomacy.
https://youtu.be/GwbEfZLmGoY
0 replies
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The Ambassador (1988 D (B))
22 Apr 22 UTC
(+1)
Ankara Crescent
London to Bulgaria
Edinburgh to Naples
Liverpool to Ionian
63 replies
Open
gopher27 (1606 D Mod)
21 Oct 22 UTC
Provocative Question
If Xi Jinping had been recruited as a long term, deep cover agent by the CIA (perhaps during his visit to Iowa) a la Günter Guillaume, Anthony Blunt or Eleanor Iselin, what would the CIA have him doing differently to sabotage China as a potential competitor of the USA?
24 replies
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The Ambassador (1988 D (B))
25 Sep 22 UTC
One bourbon, one scotch and one beer
Thoughts on the topic?
26 replies
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Flame (1092 D)
05 Nov 22 UTC
(+1)
Forum avatars
We have got a new feature on webdiplomacy.ru.
Avatars for users. Please check it out here:
https://webdiplomacy.ru/forum.php
8 replies
Open
kaner406 (2243 D Mod (B))
19 Apr 22 UTC
Bourse 2022
Bourse 2022 sign up thread...
111 replies
Open
Lord Saviour (1341 D)
03 Oct 22 UTC
We need something to resurrect the forums. Any ideas?
Cars, politics, sports or even Jesus if it comes to it. We need to talk about something. It hurts to see the Winning thread dying. Maybe it is time to replace it with something completely new...
34 replies
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The Ambassador (1988 D (B))
03 Nov 22 UTC
Weird weather?
It's like less than a month until summer here in Australia and we're going through a cold snap. Those in the northern hemisphere have you got similar whacky stuff happening with warmer than normal (or something else odd) going on?
18 replies
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kestasjk (0 D)
13 Oct 22 UTC
(+2)
webDip merge
Hey all, kestasjk from webDiplomacy.net here.

I have a feeling this is going to get shot down straight away but that's totally fine; just want to lay out a long-term proposal for merging the code bases and see whether it's worth thinking about or if I'm barking up the wrong tree.
55 replies
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The Ambassador (1988 D (B))
03 Oct 22 UTC
Putin & your Dip spidey senses
As Diplomacy players I think we’re particular attuned to seeing a geopolitical situation get out of control….
105 replies
Open
drano019 (2716 D Mod)
25 Oct 22 UTC
VDip Community
See Below
5 replies
Open
GOD (1678 D Mod (B))
24 Oct 22 UTC
The least played variant
It’s this, with just four games:

https://www.vdiplomacy.com/variants.php?variantID=54
11 replies
Open
gopher27 (1606 D Mod)
20 Oct 22 UTC
Anarchy in the UK
British Politics seems to be taking over the "Putin for Diplomats" thread. Offering such discussions a home.
gopher27 (1606 D Mod)
20 Oct 22 UTC
From the Wall Street Journal (for those without a subscription):

The U.K. Market Meltdown Could Be Headed Your Way
The standard explanation for Truss’s bad few weeks doesn’t hold up. The real reason is far scarier.

As fun as it might be for outsiders to gawk at the political chaos engulfing the U.K., Prime Minister Liz Truss’s resignation Thursday is a sideshow. The bigger problem is that recent events in Britain are an alarming vision of a fate that potentially awaits all of us in developed economies.

The conventional view of Ms. Truss’s rise and unfortunate fall holds that markets took fright after then-Chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng on Sept. 23 announced a major package of tax cuts and energy subsidies. This triggered a rout in the market for the pound and government bonds, or gilts, as investors worried about the government’s capacity to pay its bills. Improperly hedged pension funds found themselves forced to sell gilts in ever larger quantities. The Bank of England stabilized the market with emergency gilt purchases, buying time for Ms. Truss and new Chancellor Jeremy Hunt to abandon the tax-cut plans that had spooked investors. Once she had done so, order was restored. Her departure will draw a line under this debacle.

It’s such a convenient story that apparently no one in the British press is capable of spotting the holes in it. Yet every sentence in the preceding paragraph is a non sequitur.

The tax-cut package, priced at around £161 billion over five years, was modest compared with the fiscal government blowouts being undertaken in other developed economies. U.K. net borrowing for the current year was expected to increase by £62.4 billion compared with the previous budget, including the cost of energy subsidies. This also couldn’t have surprised markets, since all but a £2 billion (in the first year) tax cut for higher earners already had been signaled by Ms. Truss’s new administration.

Even without spending cuts, the package would have pushed the government deficit to around 7.5% of gross domestic product and debt to around 100% of GDP after five years. That level of indebtedness is far from extraordinary these days.

Then there’s the question of how one gets from a bond selloff to a central-bank bailout for pension funds, of all things. Britain’s defined-benefit pension managers certainly have gotten caught out by the near-catastrophic failure of a hedging strategy designed to sustain them through long periods of ultralow interest rates. Rising rates are triggering collateral calls for these hedges, and if the tax plan hadn’t caused an emergency, something else would have soon.

Stipulate that no central banker or politician wants to preside over the failure of one or more large pension funds. But these funds also didn’t, until three weeks ago, enjoy explicit or implicit backing by the central bank. Nor is it obvious why the central bank should bail them out by intervening in the broader gilt market rather than, say, offering direct assistance to specific funds in jeopardy, as a lender of last resort typically would.

While we’re at it, note another contradiction. Commentators have coalesced around a theory that markets scorned the tax-cut plan because investors feared it would be inflationary. Yet they’ve all seemingly accepted that the proper solution is for the government to backtrack on the central bank’s anti-inflationary policies, as when the Bank of England hints it might further delay its already languid quantitative tightening. And “success” for the central bank and administration alike is measured via falling gilt rates—with a fervent hope that moderating mortgage rates will keep the air in the house-price bubble. Huh?

If the accepted General Theory of Trussonomics doesn’t hold up, try this: The markets’ beef with Trussonomics was that it might have worked.

This episode exposed the astounding fragility of the global financial system after nearly 15 years of extraordinarily low interest rates and quantitative easing. British pension funds literally can’t survive higher rates. Can anyone else?

From this perspective, the central bank’s pension intervention makes more sense. The point wasn’t only to bail out pension funds. It was to reassure everyone else that gilt rates wouldn’t rise too quickly and trigger distress elsewhere. Narrowly tailored support for pensions wouldn’t have accomplished this. High rates rather than insolvent pensions are the real financial-stability threat.

Yet higher rates would be both cause and effect of the sort of economy the supply-sider Ms. Truss wanted to create. She wanted a Britain of faster economic growth but also stronger incentives for productive Main Street investment instead of financial machinations such as the exotic hedging strategies that have failed for pension funds. Indeed, her main criticism of the Bank of England was that it hasn’t raised rates faster to combat inflation (and, left unsaid, to assist a pivot toward productive investment).

Economic growth, which brings with it higher interest rates, might now be viewed by many in the market as a bug rather than a feature. It’s terrible news if so. Britain has shown over the past month that it cowers in the shadow of a financial system that can no longer tolerate productive economic growth or the policies necessary to achieve it. Will other countries find the same to be true for them?
GOD (1678 D Mod (B))
20 Oct 22 UTC
Economic growth is not seen as a bug anywhere, to my awareness.

While being well argumented for the first part, the last sentences just jump to the conclusion that the Trussonomics would have brought growth, without explaining how or why. Might someone fill the gap?
mouse (2095 D)
20 Oct 22 UTC
(+2)
GOD - that's the point of neoliberal 'economics' mouthpieces like the WSJ, though - they just keep parroting talking points - sometimes not provable, sometimes trivially *dis*provable - that are mostly unrelated to the actual analysis that occurred in other parts of the article, in the hope that enough people fall for an 'argument from authority' and don't realise that neoliberal capitalism is fundamentally broken for the /vast/ majority of people.
gopher27 (1606 D Mod)
20 Oct 22 UTC
It is a bit of the reverse.

There is no safe path out of the de-industrialized, uber-financialized economy, and interest rates cannot be normalized because the financial structures cannot bear normalized interest rates. Normal growth would push up interest rates as capital investment would compete with public and financial borrowers, but neither governments nor the financial super-structure can withstand the forces set in motion by positive real interest rates after a decade of quantitative easing and zero interest rate policies.

The UK had seen market determined interest rates on government debt move up to the same levels as America and Australia. UK pound-denominated 10 year bonds went from 1% to 4% since December. These rates are still massively negative in real terms but they are threatening the solvency of British Pensions because of long term strategies the Pensions employed to navigate the decade of 0% interest rates.

The idea is that we may all be turning Japanese where the Bank of Japan is defending a 0.25% rate on their 10 year bonds as the Yen collapses. Were the Japanese economy to start really growing (by some miracle) and experiencing stupendous productivity growth, there is a significant possibility that that would implode the entire system. Meaningful economic growth would spike investment, which while better in the long run, would push up interest rates in the short run and any meaningful positive rate of interest would destroy the banks and likely the public finances before the economy achieved escape velocity to power through the repricing of the accumulated debt.

It is not so much a defense of "neoliberalism" as a preemptive possible "I told you so" against central bank policy over the last 14 years. This debt trap scare mongering may be overblown, but the point is substantive.

US Treasury bonds have performed worse this year than they did at that start of the inflation of the 1970s and worse than they did in 1931 when there were currency concerns after the Pound Crisis during the Great Depression. Some individuals, insurance companies and pensions in the US are likely facing solvency concerns at the moment as a result. The US National Debt is also heavily weighted towards short duration, so rising interest rates will drive up financing costs very quickly. If the entire US National Debt were repriced to current bond rates, then interest expenses would exceed our Defense Budget. At least, high inflation will improve government finances due to the distorted manner in which we calculate "official" inflation which will serve to drive up tax receipts and suppress government spending.
gopher27 (1606 D Mod)
21 Oct 22 UTC
"Some individuals, insurance companies and pensions in the US are likely facing solvency concerns at the moment as a result."

I should add that a member of the Federal Reserve Open Market Committee has just been exposed as having traded $50,000 in US Treasury Bonds in violation of ethics rules. This is after multiple members of the FOMC were forced out for trading in stocks in violation of ethics rules.

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/10/14/federal-reserve-probing-bostics-trading-after-blackout-period-transactions.html
GOD (1678 D Mod (B))
21 Oct 22 UTC
Yeah the WSJ had a big piece on inside trading last week, quite interesting.

So you’re saying that new financing would become much more expensive, or the contracts running currently?
gopher27 (1606 D Mod)
21 Oct 22 UTC
Debt rolls over. Old debt becomes new debt as it is refinanced. But that is the issue on the government side.

Insurance companies, pension plans and some individuals hold bonds which get repriced lower as interest rates rise. With "mark to market" accounting , that can generate massive accounting losses, but perhaps more dangerously, if the bonds are posted as collateral for margin borrowing, reverse repo arrangements or any number of derivative schemes, then death spirals become a real danger. My impression is that European banks and insurance companies have been forced through regulatory actions to hold quite large positions in sovereign debt. (This is how one sustains negative interest rates for years and years) Therefore, that debt cannot be allowed to re-price without crashing the financial system.
gopher27 (1606 D Mod)
21 Oct 22 UTC
Just an observation: On January 1, 2021, one US dollar bought 103 Japanese yen. Today, that same dollar buys 151 yen. The exchange rate may well break through 152 for the end of the day.


8 replies
Xenon Radon (1897 D)
20 Oct 22 UTC
How does the Rank system work?
I'm curious why everyone else with 1800+ points are "Diplomat" but I am ranked as "Experienced".
15 replies
Open
David Hood (976 D)
20 Oct 22 UTC
Oct 2022 edition of Deadline News from the Diplomacy Broadcast Network
Hey there Diplomacy fans, the latest issue of the Diplomacy Broadcast Network's monthly news show has just been released. An interview with the TD of the upcoming World Dipcon in Vermont, a panel discussion about using Dip skills in everyday life, and headlines from around the world of Diplomacy. https://youtu.be/aIhQESKW04g
0 replies
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Rancher (1383 D)
19 Oct 22 UTC
Favorite Variants?
As mentioned recently, the forum could use a little reboot with some casual but relevant conversation. Naturally, then let me ask all of you to discuss your favorite variants here, and then we can all tell you why you are wrong

Those who know me well will not be surprised that I say Rinascimento and Germany 1648
2 replies
Open
Qapoleon (1000 D)
16 Oct 22 UTC
New column in the variants list?
Was browsing statistics and was thinking it would be sweet to see the standard deviation of the performance values listed on the variants list page. That way you could essentially sort the collection by how balanced it is.
0 replies
Open
Fake Al (1747 D)
25 Aug 22 UTC
Best map variants ever made
Which maps variants are best designed in your opinion. Not necessarily your favorites. I’m thinking those that give fun and interesting gameplay for all players, but you can use your own criteria.
23 replies
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Quarantino (1000 D)
16 Sep 22 UTC
1900 New Game Available
Tillers of the Poppy Fields. Someone's gotta do it.
2 days. 20 points. Random country.
1 reply
Open
AJManso4 (2095 D)
04 Oct 22 UTC
Question - Brain fart
Say there are 5 provinces in a sealane. C is the center. A, B, C, D, and F are placed like this. All 4 of them can touch the other.
5 replies
Open
frostwind (1395 D)
06 Sep 22 UTC
Temporary Replacement in Unranked 50 States
tl;dr will be touching grass and hauling ass, someone plox manage a dozen+ center power in my absence for up to 10 days. willing to negotiate if my replacement wants to keep the power or some other compensation.
6 replies
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David Hood (976 D)
19 Sep 22 UTC
September 2022 Deadline News is out!
Latest episode of Deadline News was just released by the Diplomacy Broadcast Network. This one includes a panel discussion about endgame strategy, an interview with longtime Dip hobbyist Brad Wilson about both Diplomacy and his sports journalism career, and headlines from around the world of Diplomacy.
https://youtu.be/Ttw4IWaodaA
0 replies
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Anon (?? D)
15 Sep 22 UTC
Europa Renovatio New Game Available - All Welcome
https://vdiplomacy.com/board.php?gameID=53553#gamePanel

A new Europa game is here, for all who missed the previous most recent one. Join if you dare... O_O
3 replies
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